Category Archives: Archaeology

Archaeologists find 25 skeletons in medieval Cambridge friary

Cambridge-Skeleton

More than 25 skeletons have been unearthed by archaeologists investigating the site of a medieval friary in the centre of Cambridge. Archaeologists say the skeletons are in good condition and they expect to find as many as 40 in the coming weeks. The land was home to a friary between 1290 and 1538, making many…

Saxon workshop evidence found by amateur archaeologists in Somerset

Saxon Forge

Amateur archaeologists have unearthed what is believed to be a Saxon workshop in a dig in Somerset. The foundations were uncovered along with a large Norman building at an undisclosed location on the Mendip Hills. Saxon keys and a 13th Century jug were also among the finds. Project leader Pip Osborne, said: “There’s no written…

Major Viking Age manor discovered at Birka, Sweden

Sweden-Viking-Birka

During spring of 2016 a number of large presumed house terraces were identified by the authors at Korshamn. As a consequence high resolution geophysical surveys using ground-penetrating radar were carried out in September 2016. Korshamn is one of the main harbour bays of the island of Björkö, situated outside the town boundaries of the Viking…

Leprosy in the Middle Ages – A Tale of Tragedy and Prejudice

pilgrim-graves-leprosy

Leprosy has always been a subject of interest among scientists, since there is and was a lot of controversy surrounding it. According to traditional theories, during the Middle Ages, when the disease was blooming, people afflicted by it were treated as outcasts – shunned by every layer of society and forced to live in shadows…

Workmen uncover Hartlepool Anglo-Saxon burial site while rebuilding a wall

Anglo-Saxon Hartlepool

An exciting historic find has been made on the Headland after workmen rebuilding a wall came across an Anglo-Saxon burial site. Remains of at least six people and the corner of a building believed to date back almost 1,400 years have been uncovered by archaeologists in an alley behind Gladstone Street. They are believed to…

Coins discovery ‘will re-write’ Anglo-Saxon history

Anglo-Saxon Hoard

The Anglo-Saxon coins are said to point to some sort of an alliance in the 870s between Alfred the Great and a rival. Historians say an entire chapter of the Anglo-Saxon period will have to be re-written after a metal detectorist found a huge hoard of coins in a field. James Mather made the discovery…

Lost Kingdom of Rheged Discovered in Scotland

Rheged-hill-excavation

The archaeological site at Trusty’s Hill in Galloway, Scotland, is known to have been a cultural center for the Pict, the confederation of tribal peoples that lived in what is now northern and eastern Scotland during Roman times. After some five years of excavation, however, researchers working there now believe they have uncovered something far…

Medieval Winchester skeleton reveals how leprosy spread

medieval-leprosy-skeleton

The skeleton of a medieval leprosy victim found in one of Britain’s earliest known hospitals has shed light on the history of the disfiguring disease. The remains of a young man, between the age of 18 and 25, were found in the St Mary Magdalen leprosarium near Winchester, Hampshire. Researchers suggests the man was a…

The discovery of medieval Trellech and the plucky amateurs of archaeology

Trellech

The tale of how an amateur archaeologist’s hunch led him to uncover a lost medieval town and spend £32,000 of his own money to buy the land, would stand to be the archaeological discovery of any year. On the border between England and Wales, the site of the medieval town of Trellech reveals much about…

Reconstructed face of Robert the Bruce is unveiled

robert-the-bruce

Historians have unveiled a digitally-reconstructed image of the face of Robert the Bruce almost 700 years after his death. The image has been produced using casts from what is believed to be the skull of the famous Scottish king. It is the culmination of a two-year research project by researchers at universities in Glasgow and…

World’s 1st Plague Pandemic Bacteria Gets New Genetic Analysis

Justinian Plague

With a single tooth from an ancient human skeleton found in Germany, scientists have now created the most complete genetic picture yet of the bacteria that caused the world’s first plague pandemic. The Justinianic Plague killed 50 million people from the sixth to eighth centuries, and was caused by the same species of bacteria, Yersinia…

Lost Medieval castle discovered at House of Dun

Dun Castle

Archaeological excavations at the House of Dun have uncovered the remains of what is thought to be a 14th century castle. The excavations were carried out as part of the National Trust for Scotland’s Trailblazer residential working holidays, which offer the opportunity for young people aged 16 to 17 to experience archaeological excavations and conservation…

King Arthur’s Home? Archaeologists Investigate Legendary Birthplace

King Arthur Castle dig

Archaeologists are investigating a mysterious coastal settlement that they think may have been home to post-Roman British royalty, at Tintagel in Cornwall, England, the reputed birthplace of the legendary King Arthur. Hundreds of pieces of “high-status” pottery and glass were found at the site, located on England’s southwest coast. The researchers said the headland was…

Search Is On for King Henry I, Who May Be Buried Under a Parking Lot

Henry I Reading Abbey

Looking for a dead medieval king? You might want to check under a parking lot. That theory, at least, is on the minds of archaeologists and historians in Reading, about 40 miles west of London, who this week will begin searching for the high altar of the abbey founded by King Henry I. They believe…

Mapping the Medieval: Ithaca College Professor Building Digital Model of Ireland’s Trim Castle

Trim Castle Map

Imagine touring a medieval castle without ever leaving your room. That may soon be possible thanks to the efforts of Professor Michael “Bodhi” Rogers and a team of students from Ithaca College. Rogers and four students traveled to County Meath, Ireland, in June to use a laser scanner to map Trim Castle. Built during the…