Category Archives: Archaeology

Coins discovery ‘will re-write’ Anglo-Saxon history

Anglo-Saxon Hoard

The Anglo-Saxon coins are said to point to some sort of an alliance in the 870s between Alfred the Great and a rival. Historians say an entire chapter of the Anglo-Saxon period will have to be re-written after a metal detectorist found a huge hoard of coins in a field. James Mather made the discovery…

Lost Kingdom of Rheged Discovered in Scotland

Rheged-hill-excavation

The archaeological site at Trusty’s Hill in Galloway, Scotland, is known to have been a cultural center for the Pict, the confederation of tribal peoples that lived in what is now northern and eastern Scotland during Roman times. After some five years of excavation, however, researchers working there now believe they have uncovered something far…

Medieval Winchester skeleton reveals how leprosy spread

medieval-leprosy-skeleton

The skeleton of a medieval leprosy victim found in one of Britain’s earliest known hospitals has shed light on the history of the disfiguring disease. The remains of a young man, between the age of 18 and 25, were found in the St Mary Magdalen leprosarium near Winchester, Hampshire. Researchers suggests the man was a…

The discovery of medieval Trellech and the plucky amateurs of archaeology

Trellech

The tale of how an amateur archaeologist’s hunch led him to uncover a lost medieval town and spend £32,000 of his own money to buy the land, would stand to be the archaeological discovery of any year. On the border between England and Wales, the site of the medieval town of Trellech reveals much about…

Reconstructed face of Robert the Bruce is unveiled

robert-the-bruce

Historians have unveiled a digitally-reconstructed image of the face of Robert the Bruce almost 700 years after his death. The image has been produced using casts from what is believed to be the skull of the famous Scottish king. It is the culmination of a two-year research project by researchers at universities in Glasgow and…

World’s 1st Plague Pandemic Bacteria Gets New Genetic Analysis

Justinian Plague

With a single tooth from an ancient human skeleton found in Germany, scientists have now created the most complete genetic picture yet of the bacteria that caused the world’s first plague pandemic. The Justinianic Plague killed 50 million people from the sixth to eighth centuries, and was caused by the same species of bacteria, Yersinia…

Lost Medieval castle discovered at House of Dun

Dun Castle

Archaeological excavations at the House of Dun have uncovered the remains of what is thought to be a 14th century castle. The excavations were carried out as part of the National Trust for Scotland’s Trailblazer residential working holidays, which offer the opportunity for young people aged 16 to 17 to experience archaeological excavations and conservation…

King Arthur’s Home? Archaeologists Investigate Legendary Birthplace

King Arthur Castle dig

Archaeologists are investigating a mysterious coastal settlement that they think may have been home to post-Roman British royalty, at Tintagel in Cornwall, England, the reputed birthplace of the legendary King Arthur. Hundreds of pieces of “high-status” pottery and glass were found at the site, located on England’s southwest coast. The researchers said the headland was…

Search Is On for King Henry I, Who May Be Buried Under a Parking Lot

Henry I Reading Abbey

Looking for a dead medieval king? You might want to check under a parking lot. That theory, at least, is on the minds of archaeologists and historians in Reading, about 40 miles west of London, who this week will begin searching for the high altar of the abbey founded by King Henry I. They believe…

Mapping the Medieval: Ithaca College Professor Building Digital Model of Ireland’s Trim Castle

Trim Castle Map

Imagine touring a medieval castle without ever leaving your room. That may soon be possible thanks to the efforts of Professor Michael “Bodhi” Rogers and a team of students from Ithaca College. Rogers and four students traveled to County Meath, Ireland, in June to use a laser scanner to map Trim Castle. Built during the…

Skeleton provides evidence that confirms historical events mentioned in the Norwegian Viking Sagas

Viking-Sagas

Archaeologists working in Trondheim in Norway have unearthed a human skeleton in the bottom of an abandoned castle well. The skeleton provides evidence that confirms dramatic historical events mentioned in the Viking Sagas. The location and contents of the well are mentioned in Sverre’s Saga, a chronicle of one of the kings of Norway, and…

Healthy ‘Vampires’ Emerge From Graves In Medieval Polish Cemetery

medieval-vampire-grave

Archaeologists excavating a Medieval cemetery site in Kałdus, Poland, recently discovered hundreds of graves — among them, they found 14 anti-vampire burials. Some of these people were decapitated, others buried face-down, and still more were weighted down with stones. One of the major theories about ancient “vampire” graves is that people buried in this way…

10 Historic Hungarian Castles

sumeg castle

Kinizsi Castle Kinizsi Castle is a 14th century fortification, located in the village of Nagyvázsony in the Veszprém county. The castle was named after Pál Kinizsi, a Hungarian general in the service of King Matthias Corvinus. He was the Count of Temes from 1484 and Captain-General of the Lower Parts. He is famous for his…

Budding archaeologists wanted for ‘ancient graveyard’ dig on Anglesey

archaeologists wanted for ancient graveyard

The search is on to find volunteers to help unearth what could be an ancient graveyard on Anglesey. Gwynedd Archaeological Trust is looking for curious people to help dig at an excavation on the edge of Llangefni at Hedd yr Ynys. It’s not known for sure what lies beneath the field, however it is thought…

Remains of medieval kitchen that served pilgrims discovered in Suffolk

medieval-kitchen

The remains of a medieval kitchen where cooks may have prepared meals for hungry pilgrims, has been discovered in Suffolk. The rare 14th Century building was discovered on the site of Guildhall Feoffment School, which itself was built on an 11th century road system in Bury St Edmunds. While the flint and mortar outline of…