Tag Archive: Anglo-Saxon

MAP#55: Bernard Cornwell Interview – The Empty Throne

Empty-Throne-Bernard-Cornwell

Few authors can capture the atmosphere of the middle ages as well as Bernard Cornwell. A master storyteller Bernard has written over 50 books! I first discovered Bernard Cornwell in the early 2000s when I was browsing at a local bookstore. A book titled The Archer’s Tale caught my attention and the main character was…

£78,000 For Anglo Saxon Coin, Could it Solve an Anglo-Saxon Murder?

anglo-saxon-rare-silver-coin

A rare silver coin has sold for £78,000 at auction, and experts claim its discovery could provide a clue to the gruesome murder of an Anglo-Saxon king 1,200 years ago. The coin was struck in the reign of East Anglian ruler Aethelbert II and describes him as king – the only time this title has…

Anglo Saxon Map of London

Anglo saxon London map

Look around any map of London and you’ll find the echoes of long-forgotten individuals. Cena, Padda, Fulla… ancient farmers who had no idea their names would live on down the centuries as Kennington, Paddington and Fulham. Could the dairyman whose cheese farm (Ces wican) once graced the banks of the Thames have conceived that his…

Mapping Miracles: Cambridge project on Medieval hagiography

St George

Saints and miracles in today’s Church are connected through the canonization process. Usually, for a person to be beatified, and then canonized, a miracle by their intercession must be verified. But this saint-miracle connection is older than the process of canonization, and the stories of saints from the earliest times are often accompanied by tales…

Aethelstan, Anglo-Saxon King of England

King Aethelstan | Medieval Archives

Susan Abernethy joins Medieval Archives with another fantastic post! Susan is the Freelance History Writer, covering topics from Ancient history to the 20th Century. Visit her blog at thefreelancehistorywriter.com. You can also like The Freelance History Writer on Facebook or follow Susan on Twitter. ~The Archivist Aethelstan was the first King of Wessex to bring…

The River Thames, A Not-So-Secret Treasure Trove

Thames River artifacts

In the United Kingdom, British archaeologists have made a number of significant discoveries as of late, from the battered remains of King Richard III — found buried beneath a parking lot — to, more recently, a 14th-century burial ground for plague victims in London. British soil is, in fact, full of traces of the past….

Edward the Confessor, King of England

Edward the Confessor

Susan Abernethy joins the Medieval Archives with another great post. Susan is the Freelance History Writer, covering topics from Ancient history to the 20th Century. Visit her blog at thefreelancehistorywriter.com. You can also like Susan on Facebook or follow Susan on Twitter. ~The Archivist Edward the Confessor was the last Anglo-Saxon king who could trace…

New details on the medieval ‘vampire’ burial

medieval vampire skull

The discovery of a skeleton found with metal spikes through its shoulders, heart and ankles, dating from 550-700AD and buried in the ancient minster town of Southwell, Notts, is detailed in a new report. It is believed to be a ‘deviant burial’, where people considered the ‘dangerous dead’, such as vampires, were interred to prevent…

No sexy outfits, nuns told in 1,300-year-old ‘rule’ book

Nun

Nuns in Essex were warned to avoid garments that would “nourish the fires of sexual anticipation” in a 1,300-year-old book of advice now up for auction. They were held up as paragons of virtue, but one congregation of Essex nuns appear to have needed some pointers on how to conduct themselves. In a book of…

History revealed on Ingleborough

The flanks of Ingleborough in the Yorkshire Dales National Park have given up one of their secrets to a team of amateur archaeologists. Members of the Ingleborough Archaeology Group spent weeks investigating a remote site on the side of one of the National Park’s famous Three Peaks to the west of Selside in Upper Ribblesdale….

Colchester dig uncovers ‘spearmen’ skeletons

The teeth of the tribal warriors will be tested to find out how old they are The bones of two Anglo-Saxon soldiers have been discovered beneath former Army barracks in Colchester. They may have lived and fought in the 5th or 6th Century AD, Colchester Archaeological Trust said. The bodies had shields on their chests,…

Kent’s regal history revealed in new book

Wealth, power and influence were all words associated with Kent when the county reigned as the world’s first Anglo-Saxon and Christian kingdom. For a brief period more than 1,000 years ago it was recognised as the most important place in England, noted for its power, culture, wealth and international contacts. However, by the ninth century…

Michael Wood’s Story of England: Big historical secrets – in a humble Midlands village

Story of England, which begins on BBC Four tonight, is a very simple idea: to tell the story of one place through the whole of English history, from Anglo-Saxons and Vikings to the Somme and D-Day – and from the point of view of the people, not the rulers. It tries to show the slow…