Tag Archive: England

15 castles in Kent you can visit for a great family day out

Dover_Castle

Canterbury Castle © Tim Stubbings The ruined Norman castle, which was begun by William the Conqueror in 1070, is one of the most ancient in Britain. The castle became a ruin in the 17th century after it was constructed as one of the three royal castles in Kent in the reign of Henry I (1100-1135)….

Medieval Winchester skeleton reveals how leprosy spread

medieval-leprosy-skeleton

The skeleton of a medieval leprosy victim found in one of Britain’s earliest known hospitals has shed light on the history of the disfiguring disease. The remains of a young man, between the age of 18 and 25, were found in the St Mary Magdalen leprosarium near Winchester, Hampshire. Researchers suggests the man was a…

The discovery of medieval Trellech and the plucky amateurs of archaeology

Trellech

The tale of how an amateur archaeologist’s hunch led him to uncover a lost medieval town and spend £32,000 of his own money to buy the land, would stand to be the archaeological discovery of any year. On the border between England and Wales, the site of the medieval town of Trellech reveals much about…

King Arthur’s Home? Archaeologists Investigate Legendary Birthplace

King Arthur Castle dig

Archaeologists are investigating a mysterious coastal settlement that they think may have been home to post-Roman British royalty, at Tintagel in Cornwall, England, the reputed birthplace of the legendary King Arthur. Hundreds of pieces of “high-status” pottery and glass were found at the site, located on England’s southwest coast. The researchers said the headland was…

Prince Arthur: The Tudor King Who Never Was by Sean Cunningham

Virtual book tours are taking over the internet. Earlier this year we took part in the blog tour for Kristie Dean’s book On The Trail of the Yorks. Today we are part of the tour for Sean Cunningham’s new book Prince Arthur: The Tudor King Who Never Was, a look at the life of Prince…

Medieval cemetery discovered under Cambridge college will help unlock secrets of the Black Death

medieval-skeletons

More than 1,200 human skeletons discovered beneath a Cambridge college will help shed new light on the city’s medieval past. The medieval cemetery was discovered by archaeologists working at the Old Divinity School at St John’s College, which was built on the site of a 13th century hospital. The remains of men, women and children…

Virtual Reality App: London in the Middle Ages

Timelooper

A new virtual reality app is available and ready to transport you back to the Middle Ages. Check out the video below and visit the Timelooper website to download the app. Timelooper is available for iOS and Andriod.

‘Joan of Arc’ ring sells for £240,000 after English v French bidding battle

joan of arc ring

A medieval ring long associated with Joan of Arc sold for £240,000 – almost 30 times its estimate – at Timeline Auctions in Bloomsbury on February 25. It was bought by two French solicitors thought to be acting on behalf of the French government. In the transcript of Joan’s Trial of Condemnation in 1431 several…

Five missing medieval kings and queens – and where we might find them

Henry I

As a second carpark becomes the suspected burial site of a medieval English monarch, we wonder: who else is still under the tarmac? As 2016 begins, the recent public interest in hunting for royal burials shows no sign of abating. Hardly has the dust begun to settle on Richard III’s expensive new tomb in Leicester…

Backyard Bonanza: Medieval Outhouses and Roman Roads Unearthed

medieval_outhouse

Backyards haven’t changed much over the past 1,000 years or so, new archaeological findings suggest. Rubbish pits, storage areas, outhouses, wells and short walls to keep the neighbors at bay are a few of the things that archaeologists in England recently unearthed while digging beneath an old bus depot in the city of Leicester. Dating…

MAP#68: Combat of the Thirty

Combat-of-the-30

During the first phase of the Hundred Years War a smaller war broke out in France, the Breton War of Succession. Wars of Succession always start the same way, a Nobleman dies without an heir. In this case it was the Duke of Brittany, John the Good, who died childless in 1341. Two men stepped…

The Holy Ghost: Historian pinpoints final resting place of one of medieval England’s greatest ships

Historians and archaeologists have tentatively identified the location of one of medieval England’s greatest ships. Detailed archival and aerial photographic research carried out by British maritime historian, Ian Friel, has pinpointed a 30 metre stretch of the River Hamble near Southampton as the final resting place of one of Henry V’s largest warships – the…

Neurological condition probably caused medieval scribe’s shaky handwriting

shakey_scribe

Scribes usually have pretty good handwriting. That’s not the case for one prolific 13th century writer known to scholars only as the Tremulous Hand of Worcester. Now scientists suggest the writer suffered from a neurological condition called essential tremor. Neurologist Jane Alty and historical handwriting researcher Deborah Thorpe, both of the University of York in…

50 Graves Uncovered at Medieval Pilgrimage Site in England

Warwickshire-skeletons

The skeletal remains of about 50 medieval individuals have been discovered in shallow graves near the pilgrimage site of a famous seventh-century saint in England. The human remains, which have been exhumed, may help archaeologists learn more about the medieval era, according to Archaeology Warwickshire, an archaeology and excavation firm. The company plans to study…

MAP#66: The Battle of Sluys (1340)

Battle of Sluys

The Battle of Sluys was the first major battle of the Hundred Years’ War. There were a few battles before it but nothing that compared to the size and ramifications of Sluys. The Hundred Years’ War was a series of wars between England’s Plantagenet Dynasty and France’s House of Valois and lasted 116 years! The…