Tag Archive: William the Conqueror

Saxon workshop evidence found by amateur archaeologists in Somerset

Saxon Forge

Amateur archaeologists have unearthed what is believed to be a Saxon workshop in a dig in Somerset. The foundations were uncovered along with a large Norman building at an undisclosed location on the Mendip Hills. Saxon keys and a 13th Century jug were also among the finds. Project leader Pip Osborne, said: “There’s no written…

15 castles in Kent you can visit for a great family day out

Dover_Castle

Canterbury Castle © Tim Stubbings The ruined Norman castle, which was begun by William the Conqueror in 1070, is one of the most ancient in Britain. The castle became a ruin in the 17th century after it was constructed as one of the three royal castles in Kent in the reign of Henry I (1100-1135)….

10 surprising facts about William the Conqueror and the Norman conquest

1) No one at the time called William ‘the Conqueror’ The earliest recorded use of that nickname occurs in the 1120s, and it didn’t really take off until the 13th century. At the time of his death in 1087, William was called ‘the Great’ by his admirers, and ‘the Bastard’ by his detractors; the latter…

Search Is On for King Henry I, Who May Be Buried Under a Parking Lot

Henry I Reading Abbey

Looking for a dead medieval king? You might want to check under a parking lot. That theory, at least, is on the minds of archaeologists and historians in Reading, about 40 miles west of London, who this week will begin searching for the high altar of the abbey founded by King Henry I. They believe…

I’ll Be King For Christmas: Medieval Coronations on Christmas Day

Charlemagne_coronation

Crowning ceremonies have existed since Ancient Times and are even described in detail in two books of the Bible, Kings II and Chronicles II. It wasn’t until the Middle Ages that the coronations became commonplace as the the Kings were seen as ordained by God. Perhaps one of the most famous Christmas Day Coronations is…

MAP#59: Author Ian Macgill, 1066 and The Rhyme of King Harold

Harold_Godwinson_1066

Journalist and author Ian Macgill found his writing passion traveling through the jungles of South America. As a young man Ian was awarded the Winston Churchill fellowship and traveled through South America studying ancient sites. His adventures in South America would make a great book as well! After his travels he returned to Britain and…

MAP#41: King Louis VIII ‘The Lion’

Louis VIII The Lion

French King Louis VIII who as a young Prince invaded England with the support of the English barons with the hope of taking the throne from King John. He would rise to King in France and take part in the Albigensian Crusade to gain back his lands in Southern France. In this episode we’ll look…

One in the eye for history: experts still fighting over the site of the Battle of Hastings

Bayeux Tapestry Death of King Harold II

It is the most famous battle in British history, fought, as every schoolboy knows, in 1066 at a site now marked by Battle Abbey, near the town of Hastings. But while the date of the Battle of Hastings might still be universally accepted, the location has been called into question, with two experts proposing not…

The Medieval Anarchy – eBook review

The Medieval Anarchy

Ah, The Anarchy, a period in England’s history when war raged and chaos reigned. A time so turbulent medieval chroniclers claimed that ‘Christ and his saints slept.’ You’ve had a chance to explore the Anarchy on this site through various podcasts and posts, but today we are going to look at an eBook on The…

Rooms to rent in an ancient castle in Durham

Durham Castle

The 11th-century Durham Castle is benefitting from a £5-million refurbishment – and now offers holiday accommodation within its ancient walls. The UNESCO World Heritage Site in north-east England is home to Durham University’s oldest college and its rooms are available to rent for bed and breakfast during the university’s vacation times. There are now 40…

Medieval Winchester Tour: Rama App Review

A few months ago I reviewed the Medieval Exeter tour for the Rama: Travel App. With over 90 tours available there are plenty of tours for the medievalist. Today we will look at the Medieval Winchester Tour by Kaye Jones (Twitter: @KayeJones). Medieval Winchester is available for $1.99 USD, covers 1.5 miles (2.4km) and takes…

MAP#19 – 1066 and The Battle of Hastings

Today is the 945th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings. We look at the year 1066, the death of King Edward the Confessor and the dispute over the throne of England. Harold Godwinson was crowned the new king of England. However, Harold Hardrada, Viking King of Norway and William the Bastard, Duke of Normandy both…

Medieval English Castle Tour – The Tower of London

The Tower of London is, compellingly and unquestionably, one of the most famous attractions in the capital. Its abundant and absorbing past will not fail to enchant you. Take a Tower of London tour with Golden Tours and investigate this noteworthy landmark. Ensure you afford some time in ascertaining what life was like imprisoned in…

Helen Castor’s ‘She-Wolves’ taste power in medieval England

Helen Castor’s very readable “She-Wolves: The Women Who Ruled England Before Elizabeth” is, she writes, “the kind of book I loved to read before history became my profession as well as my pleasure.” It’s full of beautiful, imperiled ladies; fearless knights; and remarkable, often unbelievable turns of fortune. Pause a moment if you feel this…

Author John Wright reading Friday at the ‘Downtown Bookstore’ Ontario, Canada

Robbery, The Sun Times, gun fire and a thrilling ride through history from The Silk Road to the royal court of William The Conquerer. These are some of the themes author John Wright will touch at a reading and signing of his second novel Knight Harolde at the Downtown Bookstore Friday night. It’s the second…