Category Archives: Archaeology

Medieval remains found on site of new United Utilities water pipeline near Bridekirk

Pipeline-ruins

Archaeologists investigating medieval ruins along the route of the new 100km pipeline near Cockermouth found an ancient skeleton and new clues to the area’s Roman past. The discoveries were made in a field south of Bridekirk ahead of building work taking place and have just been revealed by United Utilities. They came out of the…

This medieval astrolabe is officially world’s oldest known such instrument

A mariner’s astrolabe recovered from the wreck of one of Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama’s ships is now officially the oldest known such artifact, according to a new paper in the International Journal of Nautical Archaeology. The device is even going into the Guinness Book of World Records, along with the ship’s bell, now that the age of…

Long-lost Dark Ages abbey may have been found in Scotland

Abbey_remains

Excavations led by DigVentures have unearthed traces of a huge circular ditch at a site in Coldingham where the abbey, founded by Aebbe, an Anglo-Saxon princess born in 615AD who became a Christian convert, is believed to have stood. The ditch is believed likely to be the ‘vallum’, a boundary surrounding the abbess’ religious establishment….

Crusader skull stolen from Dublin church recovered

Crusader Skull

Last week we posted about an 800 year old Crusader body that was beheaded and the head stolen from an Irish church. Now we have some good news, the head has been recovered! ~The Archivist The skull of an 800-year-old skeleton known as the Crusader, which was stolen from the crypt of an Irish church,…

Uninhabited Irish Island Complete with Ancient Ruins Is Up for Sale

The West Coast of Ireland has some of the finest scenery in the British Isles and indeed Western Europe. Its many islands such as Achill are renowned for their wild beauty. If you have ever dreamed of owning one, you are in luck! A property website in Ireland has just listed a remote and historic…

800-yr-old Crusader Body Beheaded in an Irish Church Vault

Local media in Dublin, Ireland are reporting a shocking story of a church dating back to the early Middle Ages which suffered an attack by vandals. Some mummies in its crypt have been desecrated including the famous 800-year-old cadaver known as the Crusader Mummy, which has been decapitated and the head has been stolen. Understandably,…

Medieval woman’s hidden art career revealed by blue teeth

Nun-blue-teeth

About 1,000 years ago, a woman in Germany died and was buried in an unmarked grave in a church cemetery. No record of her life survived, and no historian had reason to wonder who she was. But when modern scientists examined her dug-up remains, they discovered something peculiar – brilliant blue flecks in the tartar…

Medieval Sword from the War of the Two Peters Unearthed In Spanish Castle

Two-Peters-Sword

The War of the Two Peters (1356-1375) was fought between Peter of Castile and Peter IV of Aragon. ~The Archivist Archaeologists have made a rare discovery during their second season of work at a Medieval castle in Aín, Castellón, Spain. The have unearthed a 700-year-old sword that is in a remarkable state. The style suggests…

Eighth-century skeleton found at Torcello Island

skeleton in Italy

On the island of Torcello, at the Ca’ Foscari University of Venice excavation site, some protagonists of the island’s thousand-year history have begun to emerge. A tomb datable to around 700 A.D. has recently been unearthed by the site’s team of scholars hailing from universities throughout Italy, under the scientific direction of archaeologist Diego Calaon…

Viking longship discovery thrills archaeologists

Viking Longship Norway

Archaeologists in Norway have used ground-penetrating radar technology to discover an extremely rare Viking longship in what experts are describing as a “sensational” find. A team from the Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU) harnessed high-resolution georadar to locate the ship in Østfold County, southeastern Norway. The 66-foot vessel, which is located in a…

DNA from skeleton puts enteric fever in medieval Europe

bones-enteric-fever

Researchers have detected Salmonella Paratyphi C, which causes enteric fever, in a 800-year-old human skeleton from Trondheim, Norway. This suggests the potentially lethal disease, more common in hot countries, was present in medieval Europe. Now scientists are speculating that the evolution of enteric fever could be linked to the domestication of pigs across northern Europe….

Boy unearths treasure of the Danish king Bluetooth in Germany

Harald-Bluetooth

A 13-year-old boy and an amateur archaeologist have unearthed a “significant” trove in Germany which may have belonged to the Danish king Harald Bluetooth who brought Christianity to Denmark. René Schön and his student Luca Malaschnitschenko were looking for treasure using metal detectors in January on northern Rügen island when they chanced upon what they…

Silk Road nomads ate way better than city dwellers

Tashbulak-Skull-770

Silk Road nomads may have been the “foodies” of the Medieval Ages. New research shows they enjoyed much more diverse diets than did their settled urban counterparts. “Historians have long thought that urban centers along the Silk Road were cosmopolitan melting pots where culinary and cultural influences from far off places came together, but our…

Winterbourne medieval barn awarded £936,600 in National Lottery funding

Winterbourne-medieval

A project to help secure the future of Winterbourne’s Medieval Barn has taken a major step forward thanks to a £936,600 grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF), made possible by money raised by National Lottery players. South Gloucestershire Council have been working with the Winterbourne Medieval Barn Trust (WMBT) to develop a £1.76 million…

Early Medieval Bavarians Imported Brides With Elongated Skulls, Archaeologists Deduce

The discovery of nine Early Medieval women in Bavaria with artificially elongated skulls, diverse genetic origins and different dietary habits than local people indicates they came from afar, one possibly from Asia, researchers reported Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. Prof. Joachim Burger and colleagues even speculate at a reason: import…