Tag Archive: Canterbury

15 castles in Kent you can visit for a great family day out

Dover_Castle

Canterbury Castle © Tim Stubbings The ruined Norman castle, which was begun by William the Conqueror in 1070, is one of the most ancient in Britain. The castle became a ruin in the 17th century after it was constructed as one of the three royal castles in Kent in the reign of Henry I (1100-1135)….

Canterbury Cathedral’s medieval window frame restored

canterbury-cathedral-stained-glass-window

The gleam of new stone in sunlight reveals that work is complete on the conservation challenge that Canterbury Cathedral would never have wanted to tackle – the reconstruction of a towering medieval window, built to hold some of the most precious stained glass in the world. “This is the stone’s time to shine, when you…

‘Chaucer’s Children’: New 3-D Imaging Technique Sheds Light On Diet Of Ancient Children

chaucers-children-teeth

A team of scientists at the University of Kent have used 3-D microscopic imaging to create a new method of examining the teeth of ancient children who lived between the 11th and 15th centuries. Current alternative methods pose the risk of damaging the teeth, whereas the new 3-D imaging technique, called dental microwear texture analysis,…

Canterbury Tales Prologue in Middle English read by Diane Jones

Pilgrims from Canterbury1

The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written by Geoffrey Chaucer at the end of the 14th century. They were mostly written in verse form in Middle English, the language of the day. Today Middle English is something of a foreign language, not recognizable by the masses. In this video Diane Jones reads the…

CFP: Peregrinatio pro amore Dei: Aspects of Pilgrimage in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

Aspects of Pilgrimage in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

Peregrinatio pro amore Dei: Aspects of Pilgrimage in the Middle Ages and Renaissance June 12-14, 2014 Denver, Colorado The Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association invites panel and paper proposals on the conference theme, “Peregrinatio pro amore Dei: Aspects of Pilgrimage in the Middle Ages and Renaissance.” The conference dates are June 12-14, 2014, and…

2012 Medieval Year in Review: Podcasts

There were a lot of great podcast episodes during 2012. We finished the Pillars of the Earth podcast series, interviewed authors, documentary hosts and medieval bloggers. Some of this years topics were requested by you, the listener. So please if you have any requests send them over. Some of the popular episodes include: Mad Monarchs…

MAP#30 – Peasant’s Revolt of 1381

When Adam delved and Eve span, Who then was the gentleman? The Peasants’ Revolt of 1381 was one of a number of popular revolts in late medieval Europe and is a major event in the history of England. Led by Wat Tyler the peasant’s rose up against the ruling class. Were they successful? Or did…

Canterbury monks witness creation of moon crater

On 18 June 1178 five monks from the Canterbury Abbey reported that they saw a spectacular flash of light on the surface of the moon. The Canterbury chronicler, Fratello Gervase took the deposition of the five monks.   In his chronicles Gervase wrote: “This year on the 18th of June, when the Moon, a slim…

Six things you must do in Canterbury: Bagpuss, Chaucer and boats trips on the River Stour

A zippy new train service has put the tranquil cathedral city in Kent within an hour’s reach of London, making it an easy place to visit for many people. Gareth Huw Davies followed at high speed in the footsteps of the Canterbury pilgrims to the perfect Christmas destination. This is his must-do list… 1…ON THE…

Site of ‘Britain’s oldest hospital’ uncovered

A site which may house Britain’s earliest known hospital has been uncovered by archaeologists. Radio carbon analysis at the former Leper Hospital at St Mary Magdalen in Winchester, Hampshire, has provided a date range of AD 960-1030 for a series of burials, many exhibiting evidence of leprosy, on the site. A number of other artefacts,…